Does Putting Jelly In The Freezer Make It Set Faster?

You’ve made jelly, but it’s not setting. Or, you need your jelly to set quicker – perhaps you;re hosting, maybe you’re just running low on time. Either of these sound familiar, at all? Well, in these kind of instances you may have considered the freezer opposed to the fridge. But is it possible or even a good idea? Let’s find out shall we!

So, does putting jelly in the freezer make it set faster? Putting jelly in the freezer does make it set faster. Though, you do need to be mindful of how long your jelly is in the freezer for as it can freeze over and become inedible. Generally, jelly placed in the freezer will set twice as fast.

Sounds good, right?

But there are certainly ways to do it, and ways not.

With more upside, there are certainly more risks involved – and that includes spoiled jelly and it all going to waste if you get it wrong.

As we shall now see in the next few sections.

Can I Put Jelly In The Freezer?

You can put jelly in the freezer, but you do have to be especially mindful when doing so. If the jelly freezes, it will become inedible; both immediately after and even after defrosting.

Now, I am talking about homemade unset jelly, and jelly made from ice cubes here.

Either way, you can transfer it to the freezer when the time is right.

But, and here’s the important thing.

You don’t want to leave this jelly in the freezer too long (beyond 1-2 hours) and beyond the time in which it has set.

I personally would also not advise you add pre-set jelly (purchased from the store in the freezer).

Here is why.

Jelly is actually a food that doesn’t freeze well, according to the National Center for Home Food Preservation.

I can personally attest to that too.

It’s because upon defrosting, you’ll likely notice that the quality and texture just isn’t the same.

It doesn’t have that thick consistency jelly is loved for.

It’s almost liquid-y (if that’s a word!)

So, be sure only to freeze your jelly for as long as it needs to set, then get it out for consumption – or for transfer into the fridge!

How To Freeze Jelly – The Right Way

There is certainly a right and wrong way to freeze jelly, so see below my tips to ensure you speed up the process while retaining the quality of this wobbly sweet treat.

Time needed: 2 hours.

  1. Prepare your jelly, following the packaging instructions or recipe

    This will include adding the jelly cubes to a bowl, adding boiling water and stirring until the cubes has dissolved. Then adding cold water and setting it aside to cool.

  2. Transfer to a freezer-suitable mould/container

    Tupperware, either glass or plastic, is ideal here. Be sure to leave enough space to allow the jelly to rise and expand.

  3. Place in the fridge

    For around 20-30 minutes, just to allow the jelly to cool ahead of freezing.

  4. Check your freezer settings

    Ensuring it’s sufficiently cold. You may need to adjust up or down depending on the existing settings.

  5. Transfer to the freezer

    Being sure to place the container down on a level surface and in a cold part of the freezer. For the remaining 60-90 minutes.

  6. Check and monitor

    Every 20 minutes or so to ensure the jelly has not frozen over.

  7. Serve or transfer back to the fridge

    You can serve immediately or place it back into the fridge until you want to serve/consume it.

How Long Does It Take For Jelly To Set In The Freezer

It typically only takes around 1-2 hours for jelly to set in the freezer. Though, it does depend on how much you freeze, freezer temperature, the storage container along with the temperature of the jelly prior to adding it to the freezer.

For the average container of jelly, you’re looking at 60-90 minutes, plus the additional 30 to prepare it ahead of this time.

So, two hours in total, generally.

FAQs

Can you freeze jelly cubes?

You can freeze jelly cubes, though there really is no need nor benefit. Jelly cubes have an almost indefinite shelf life so you can keep them in the cupboard until you want to use them.

Want to learn more? Check out my other guides related to jelly:

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